Community mental health: Experiences from Nairobi’s COVID-19 response

Habiba Amin is a Mental Health Practitioner working in emergency COVID-19 response in Nairobi, Kenya. In this post, she describes collaborating with local religious leaders and considerations for especially vulnerable groups. 

Key messages Innovations
Partner with religious leaders to spread information                 Virtual Psychological First Aid and communication tools in local languages for helpline
Intervene early in high density areas                                         Online team debriefings and phone counselling                                                                  
Consider actions from spiritual, socio-economic, medical and psychological perspectives Training on PPE and burial procedures                                      

After the Minister of Health announced the first case in Kenya, almost everything came to a standstill. Everyone started talking about COVID-19, and social media spread misinformation and panic. A few hours after the announcement, I received a call from the Muslim Psychologists and Counsellors Association (MPCA) requesting support in addressing the emergency.

I volunteered to organise a virtual Psychological First Aid (PFA) helpline for health care workers and community members. Attendance was impressive, and it helped us understand more about COVID-19, its burden on society and how best to prioritise. We all agreed our community would be the worst hit if early precautions were not taken. Hundreds of thousands of people gather five times a day for prayer at the mosques and physical distance and no-touch policies are hard to understand for many.  

It was amazing to see how everyone was interlinked, how mental health mattered, and how culture and religion played a role in determining the success of response measures.

We continued virtual meetings with the MPCA, Council of Imams, Kenya Association of Muslim Medical Profressionals (KAMMP) and community leaders. Within three days we identified needs, gaps, concerns and resources available. It was amazing to see how everyone was interlinked, how mental health mattered, and how culture and religion played a role in determining the success of response measures. Immediately after, mosques delivered sermons with information on infection prevention measures and demonstrations of proper hand-washing.

We developed action plans that had been thoroughly discussed from spiritual, socio-economic, cultural, medical and psychological perspectives. We raised 15,000 USD and organised collections for food and essential medicines. Procedures were established in case of death due to infection that followed Islamic jurisprudence. We developed communication tools in local languages summarising information on COVID-19 and prevention measures. They listed contacts of people on call 24/7, including health care workers and religious and community leaders. These were promoted through local radio and television channels and social media. We also conducted training on personal protective equipment (PPE). 

Training on burial procedures and infection prevention

The importance of mental health support became clear very quickly. Quarantine measures and lockdown are necessary to reduce spread, but we need to recognise the mental health problems they bring about: loneliness, fear and stress from financial loss and lack of basic needs like food and water. Misinformation and media overstimulation cause more panic, anxiety, confusion, depression and PTSD. Going through testing with someone in full PPE can also be a painful experience, bringing up feelings of helplessness, anxiety and worry. Should we be doing pre- and post-test counselling for COVID-19? Will those evacuating you for the hospital be polite and kind or will you be treated like an infectious prisoner?

We need to give special attention to health care workers on the front lines. They are faced with the moral dilemma of potentially infecting their families or people in public transport. The other day I chatted with a colleague whose wife is a nurse at a hospital treating COVID-19 patients. On her first day returning from work, she broke down in front of her house helpless with the fear of infecting her loved ones. It brings tears to my eyes to imagine nurses, doctors and cleaners who come home from a shift and can't hold their children.  

Embracing technology has been important in our response. We conducted several online PFA sessions with local community leaders, spiritual leaders, social workers, counsellors and youth groups. We also had virtual debriefings with health care workers, mental health workers and Imams. These went well thanks to online platforms like Zoom. We are also offering phone counselling to community members and have heard from many patients with anxiety disorders and increased reports of domestic violence and substance use.  

We need to think about what will happen to our communities a few months post COVID-19.

COVID-19 raises many questions for people with pre-existing mental health conditions and vulnerable groups. The elderly have been frightened with the information that they are at highest risk. What about children who cannot attend school or afford meals? Pregnant and breast-feeding women are afraid for their babies. What about persons with disabilities whose lives are already difficult and those with comorbidities who cannot access their regular medications? How will stigma affect those infected? What about loss and grief if a loved one passes away and you are not allowed to be with them? We need to think about what will happen to our communities a few months post COVID-19.

Mental health is key to a successful response in a country like Kenya with limited public health and mental health resources and where the majority of the population lives with less than 1 dollar a day. Stories of suicide and breakdown in quarantine indicate that we need to integrate mental health support at all levels of the response. In the same way adherence counselling was so important in HIV efforts, we need to inform and support those being tested and quarantined. We need to reassure people that being infected with COVID-19 is not their fault, provide accurate information and counteract misconceptions.

In my 14 years of working in the humanitarian sector, I have never been pushed to think about mental health being integral into an emergency response as I have during the COVID-19 pandemic. My heart goes out to the health care workers, cleaners, guards, clerks, ambulance drivers and others working around the clock to save lives at our hospital. Let’s maintain empathy and solidarity as well as physical distance. Together we will all make it.

These initiatives would not have been possible without the efforts of Riziki Ahmed, Clinical Psychologist and MPCA Chair, Rukia Mohammed, Counselor, Ali Khalid, Spiritual Leader and Dr Nabila Amin, Psychiatrist and MPCA and KAMMP member.

Key Resources: 

  • Remote Psychological First Aid during the COVID-19 outbreak: Interim Guidance, March 2020 (IFRC) [Link]
  • COVID-19: How to include marginalized and vulnerable people in risk communication and community engagement (UN Women & Translators without Borders) [Link]
  • COVID-19 and persons with psychosocial disabilities (Pan African Network of Persons with Psychosocial Disabilities) [Link]
  • Mental Health and Psychosocial Support for Staff, Volunteers and Communities in an Outbreak of Novel Coronavirus (ICRC) [Link]
  • Basic psychological support for staff health doctors and nurses (ICRC) [Link]

[Back to Stories from the field]​

[Back to Mental Health and COVID-19]


Salud mental comunitaria: Experiencias de Nairobi como respuesta al COVID-19

Habiba Amin es una profesional de la salud mental trabajando en la respuesta ante la emergencia de COVID-19 en Nairobi, Kenia. En esta publicación, ella describe cómo ha colaborado con líderes religiosos y las consideraciones a tomar en cuenta para grupos especialmente vulnerables.​ 

Mensajes clave Innovaciones
Alianza con líderes religiosos para difundir información                                                                                            Primeros Auxilios Psicológicos Virtuales y herramientas de comunicación en idiomas locales para una línea de ayuda
Intervención temprana en zonas altamente pobladas       Equipo de información en línea y consejería telefónica
Considerar acciones desde perspectivas espirituales, socioeconómicas, médicas y psicológicas Entrenamiento en equipos de protección personal y procedimientos de entierro

Después de que el Ministerio de Salud anunciara el primer caso en Kenia, casi todo se paralizó. Todos empezaron a hablar del COVID-19 y las redes sociales difundieron desinformación y pánico. Unas pocas horas después del anuncio, recibí una llamada de la Asociación de Psicólogos y Consejeros Musulmanes (APCM) solicitando apoyo para abordar la emergencia.

Me ofrecí a organizar los Primeros Auxilios Psicológicos virtuales (PAP), una línea de ayuda para trabajadores de la salud y miembros de la comunidad. La concurrencia fue impresionante y nos ayudó a entender más sobre el COVID-19, su carga en la sociedad y la mejor forma de priorizar. Todos estuvimos de acuerdo en que nuestra sociedad sería una de las más afectadas si no tomábamos precauciones tempranas. Cientos de miles de personas se reúnen cinco veces al día para rezar en las mezquitas y las políticas de distanciamiento físico y de no tocar son difíciles de entender para muchos.

Fue increíble ver cómo todos estaban interconectados, cómo la salud mental era importante y cómo la cultura y la religión jugaron un rol en determinar el éxito de las medidas de respuesta.

Continuamos las reuniones virtuales con la APCM, el Consejo de Imams, la Asociación de Profesionales Médicos Musulmanes de Kenia (APMMK) y los líderes comunitarios. En tres días identificamos necesidades, brechas, preocupaciones y recursos disponibles. Within three days we identified needs, gaps, concerns and resources available. Fue increíble ver cómo todos estaban interconectados, cómo la salud mental era importante y cómo la cultura y la religión jugaron un rol en determinar el éxito de las medidas de respuesta. Inmediatamente después, los sermones de las mezquitas incluían información sobre medidas de prevención de infecciones y demostraciones de cómo lavarse las manos correctamente. 

Desarrollamos planes de acción que han sido discutidos a fondo desde perspectivas espirituales, socioeconómicas, culturales, médicas y psicológicas. Recolectamos 15,000 USD y organizamos colectas de alimentos y medicinas esenciales. Se establecieron procedimientos en caso de muerte debido a infección que seguía la jurisprudencia Islámica. Desarrollamos herramientas de comunicación en idiomas locales para resumir información sobre el COVID-19 y medidas de prevención. Estas tienen una lista de personas de guardia 24/7, incluyendo personal de salud y líderes religiosos y comunitarios. Estas fueron promocionadas en radios locales, canales de televisión y redes sociales. También realizamos entrenamiento sobre los equipos de protección personal (EPP). 

Entrenamiento en procedimientos de entierro y prevención de infección

La importancia del apoyo en salud mental se hizo evidente muy rápido. Las medidas de cuarentena y encierro era necesarias para reducir la propagación, pero necesitábamos reconocer los problemas de salud mental que conlleva: soledad, temor y estrés por las pérdidas económicas y la falta de recursos básicos como agua y comida. La mala información y sobre estimulación de los medios causaron más pánico, ansiedad, confusión depresión y estrés postraumático. Hacerse la prueba con una persona con EPP puede también ser una experiencia dolorosa, trayendo sentimientos de impotencia, ansiedad y preocupación. ¿Deberíamos hacer consejería antes y después de hacer la prueba para COVID-19? ¿Las personas que te llevarán al hospital serán educadas y amables o te tratarán como un prisionero infectado?

Necesitamos prestar especial cuidado a los trabajadores en la primera línea de atención. Ellos se enfrentan al dilema moral de potencialmente infectar a sus familias o a otras personas en el transporte público. El otro día conversaba con un colega cuya esposa es enfermera en un hospital que trata a pacientes con COVID-19. El primer día en que volvió del trabajo se quebró de impotencia frente a su casa por el temor de infectar a sus seres queridos. Me trae lágrimas a los ojos imaginar a enfermeras, doctores y personal de limpieza volviendo a casa de sus turnos y no poder abrazar a sus hijos.

Abrazar la tecnología ha sido una respuesta importante. Condujimos varias sesiones de PAP en línea con líderes comunitarios, líderes espirituales, trabajadores sociales, consejeros y grupos juveniles locales. También tuvimos reuniones virtuales con trabajadores de salud, trabajadores de salud mental y Imams. Estas fueron bien gracias a plataformas en línea como Zoom. También estamos ofreciendo consejería telefónica a miembros de la comunidad y hemos escuchado de muchos pacientes con trastornos de ansiedad y del incremento de reportes de violencia doméstica y uso de sustancias.

Necesitamos pensar en lo que pasará con nuestras comunidades unos meses después del COVID-19.

El COVID-19 genera muchas preguntas a las personas con condiciones pre existentes de salud mental y grupos vulnerables. Los adultos mayores se han asustado con la información de que ellos están en mayor riesgo. ¿Qué sucede con los niños que no pueden asistir a la escuela ni pueden pagar su alimentación? Las mujeres embarazadas y en etapa de lactancia están preocupadas por sus bebés. ¿Qué sucede con las personas con discapacidad que ya tienen dificultades y con aquellas que tienen comorbilidad y no pueden acceder a su medicación regular? ¿Cómo afectará el estigma a quienes han sido infectados? ¿Qué hay de las pérdidas y duelos si un ser querido fallece y no nos permiten estar con ellos? Necesitamos pensar en lo que pasará con nuestras comunidades unos meses después del COVID-19.

La salud mental es clave para una respuesta exitosa en un país como Kenia con limitados recursos de salud pública y salud mental y donde la mayoría de la población vive con menos de 1 dólar al día. Las historias de suicidio y quiebre en la cuarentena indican que necesitamos integrar el soporte de salud mental en todos los niveles de respuesta. De la misma manera en que la consejería de adherencia fue tan importante para los esfuerzos del VIH, tenemos que informar y ayudar a aquellos que se hacen la prueba y son puestos en cuarentena. Necesitamos asegurarles a las personas que están infectadas con COVID-19 que no es su culpa, brindarles información acertada y contrarrestar las ideas erróneas.

En mis 14 años trabajando en el sector humanitario, nunca fui empujada a pensar que la salud mental era integral a una respuesta de emergencia hasta que llegó la pandemia del COVID-19. Mi corazón está con los trabajadores de salud, personal de limpieza, guardias, empleados, conductores de ambulancias y otros trabajando contra el reloj para salvar vidas en nuestro hospital. Mantengamos la empatía y la solidaridad así como lo hacemos con el distanciamiento físico. Juntos lo lograremos.

Estas iniciativas no habrían sido posibles sin los esfuerzos de Riziki Ahmed, Psicólogo Clínico y Jefe del APCM, Rukia Mohammed, Consejero, Ali Khalid, Líder espiritual y la Dra. Nabila Amin, Psiquiatra y miembro de APCM y APMMK

Recursos clave​: 

  • Remote Psychological First Aid during the COVID-19 outbreak: Interim Guidance, March 2020 (ICRC) [Link]
  • COVID-19: How to include marginalized and vulnerable people in risk communication and community engagement (UN Women & Translators without Borders) [Link]
  • COVID-19 and persons with psychosocial disabilities (Pan African Network of Persons with Psychosocial Disabilities) [Link]
  • Mental Health and Psychosocial Support for Staff, Volunteers and Communities in an Outbreak of Novel Coronavirus (ICRC) [Link]
  • Basic psychological support for staff health doctors and nurses (ICRC) [Link]

[Back to Stories from the field]​

[Back to Mental Health and COVID-19]

Region: 
Africa
Population: 
Maternal and neonatal health
Children and adolescents
Adults
Older adults
Families and carers
Minority populations
Disability
Setting: 
Community
Approach: 
Advocacy
Technology
Prevention and promotion
Treatment, care and rehabilitation
Training, education and capacity building
Disorder: 
Depression/anxiety/stress-related disorders
Self-harm/suicide
How useful did you find this content?: 
0
Your rating: None
0
No votes yet
Log in or become a member to contribute to the discussion.