'Preventing and treating depression in women and girls' Webinar

1 post / 0 new
'Preventing and treating depression in women and girls' Webinar

The George Institute for Global Health and the WHO’s Global Coordination Mechanism on NCDs are hosting a webinar on ‘Preventing and treating depression in women and girls.’

The webinar is the third in a series hosted by the Community on Women and Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs). It will take place next Tuesday, October 15th at 2pm UK time, shortly after World Mental Health Day. The webinar will present the case for increased services for women and girls affected by depression, and analyze the implications across the life course. The webinar will profile three interventions that have shown great promise in helping women and girls access affordable, high-quality care in low-income communities globally.

Speakers will include: Grace Gatera (Rwanda), Lancet Youth Commission on Mental Health; Kari Frame, Program Director, StrongMinds (Uganda, Zambia); and Pallab Maulik, SMART Mental Health Programme (India). The moderator will be Dr Rochelle Burgess, Deputy Director, Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases, University College London (United Kingdom).

The World Health Organization estimates that more than 300 million people suffer from depression globally, and that of those afflicted, there are twice as many women as men. Depression, a type of non-communicable disease, is the second leading cause of disability and worsens physical as well as mental health outcomes, undermining people’s ability for self-care. Infants with mothers with depression (or whose mothers had depression during pregnancy) have poorer attachment and worse physical and cognitive outcomes. Depression also contributes to poverty by limiting work productivity and reducing people’s ability to access social and development services. In the most severe cases, it may lead to death by suicide, which is now a leading cause of maternal mortality in some countries.

Biological factors as well as stress from gender discrimination, manifested as competing work and domestic obligations, increased experience of poverty, family and gender-based violence, and sexual abuse, all contribute to the increased burden of depression in women. Yet despite the overwhelming need for services, there is a dearth of mental health professionals, access to support or cognitive therapies and modern medications in many countries. Even when available, social stigma may act as a barrier to accessing care. Cost-effective prevention and treatment options are needed to reduce and counter depression, and these interventions must be culturally appropriate and gender-sensitive. Our third webinar will present the case for increased services for women and girls affected by depression, and analyse the implications across the life-course. We will also profile three interventions that have shown great promise in helping women and girls access affordable, high-quality care in low-income communities globally.

Webinar objectives

  • To explain the impact of depression on women and girls, opportunities for prevention, and the importance of treatment;
  • To highlight, using examples from geographically disparate regions, how care for women and girls with depression can be effective and affordable, even in regions with few mental health professionals;
  • To discuss gendered approaches to screening and helping patients overcome the stigma of accessing care;
  • To identify the challenges of treating depression in cultural contexts where depression is not recognized as a disease, and approaches for overcoming this barrier to care; • To understand where more research is needed to improve the evidence-base for cost-effective prevention and treatment strategies;
  • To spark a global discussion about the above-listed themes.

If you would like to find out more about the initiatives in which our speakers are engaged, please see:

1) Lancet Youth Commission on Mental Health: https://www.mhinnovation.net/collaborations/lancet-commission-global-mental-health-and-sustainable-development and their corresponding policy brief: https://www.mhinnovation.net/resources/policy-brief-young-people-will-transform-global-mental-health

2) StrongMinds: https://www.mhinnovation.net/innovations/strongminds

3) SMART Mental Health Programme: https://www.mhinnovation.net/innovations/smart-mental-health

Registration link: http://bit.ly/addressingdepression. 

While live participation is encouraged, we will send recordings of the event to everyone who registers for this webinar.